At the age of 25, I elected to be transparent with my Mother about being Same Gender Loving. 

As many young Black men of the SGL community, I had to wade thru the complexities of my sexual identity earlier on from religion to feeling "different" and ALL that lies in between.

In the best interest of maintaining my "secret" I would primarily date guys who lived outside of the city and/or state which I lived. By dating outside of my immediate surroundings it fostered a false sense of security my "secret" would be kept safe. 

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The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) yesterday, joined Susan Taylor, former Essence magazine editor-in-chief, and the National CARES Mentoring Movement to support a youth delegation offering testimony about the experiences of Black youth struggling with trauma, stress, and mental health-- specifically Black queer students-- at “Hearing Their Stories: Students and How They Handle Their Mental Health,” hosted by the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) Taskforce on Black Youth Suicide and Mental Health.

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Growing up, as a child you're told what your gender is from birth, and what roles are associated with that. with that in mind I recall playing this game as a child called house. The rules and the roles, in the game of house were already defined and were gender specific. 

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WASHINGTON-- As the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments on cases concerning the application of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to anti-LGBT discrimination, hundreds of LGBTQ advocates from across the country are participating in the DC SCOTUS Discrimination Rally and calling out the efforts to legalize discrimination against marginalized communities, including Nakisha M. Lewis, a speaker at the rally and an advocate with the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), the nation’s leading civil rights organization dedicated to the empowerment of Black LGBTQ/SGL people including people living with HIV/AIDS. In support of the rally, Lewis and David Johns, NBJC Executive Director released the following statements:

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 Today, the Movement Advancement Project (MAP) released a new report, Where We Call Home: LGBT People of Color in Rural America,  which examines the unique challenges of LGBT people of color in rural America and highlights distinct experiences across different communities of color. As the second publication in the Where We Call Home series, this report details how the structural challenges of rural life amplify acceptance of or discrimination against LGBT people of color. 

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