WASHINGTON -- In honor of Transgender Awareness Week ending Nov. 17, the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) and and the Congressional Caucus on Black Women and Girls (CCBWG) released statements calling for the end of gender-based violence and the rising epidemic of discrimination, abuse and violence against Black Transgender and LGBTQ/Same Gender Loving people, especially Black Trans Women.
Congressional partners, including Yvette Clarke (D-NY), Robin Kelly (D-IL), and Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ) joined NBCJ Executive Director David J. Johns, and Londyn de Richelieu, a member of the NBJC Black Transgender Advisory Council to raise awareness and called on other high-profile, Civil Rights and progressive leaders and organizations to join the fight to protect Black transgender people, women, and girls and to:  

  • Recognize anti-transgender violence and gender-based violence;
  • Support justice for crimes committed against Black transgender and gender-nonconforming people; and
  • Act to stop the epidemic of gender-based violence against Black transgender women and gender non-binary Black people.
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This weekend the New York Times reported upcoming plans of the Trump Administration to take its most aggressive action, to date, by erasing the lives of transgender people and gender non-binary Americans. The Administration’s attempts to “redefine” terms that are rooted in both science and reason are calculated attempts to roll back civil rights gains made during the Obama Administration. The National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC) released the following statement from David J. Johns, Executive Director, in rebuke and to explain what is at stake for our families with the Trump Administration’s plan to dehumanize transgender people...

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October marks the observance of LGBTQ/SGL History Month . During this month we celebrate the lives and contributions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and same gender loving (LGBTQ/SGL) people. Too often LGBTQ/SGL people are erased, our contributions are rendered invisible in public schools, in the media, and in our homes. LGBTQ/SGL History Month, first celebrated in 1994, is designed to move us closer to recognizing that as long as there have been people there have been LGBTQ/SGL people and we are all better when we acknowledge and celebrate this truth. 

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I've never asked permission for how to show up in the world. From as young as I have memories I can recount how this is a fact. I have however always felt and observed how many respond to how I show up in the world. In 2002, I moved to NYC and became a member of the first church community I'd ever encountered that was #OpenAndAffirming

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As our nation grapples with celebrating community diversity as a strength, and where people from diverse backgrounds work better together to tackle the seemingly intractable problems that prevent us from thriving,  it's important to address the unique needs of marginalized individuals who are oppressed because of race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.

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